7 Healthy Office Snacks

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Do you often suffer from the mid-morning slump? What about mid-afternoon cravings? Before you dip into that box of doughnuts hanging around the office, think how much better you’d feel fuelled on nutritious snacks.

Don’t let hunger override your willpower. Be prepared with these seven healthy office snacks – one for each day of the week!

1. Nuts

Unsalted nuts make a delicious whole food replacement for chips, crackers, and other processed snacks. Options such as almonds, pistachios, walnuts, and Brazil nuts are chalked full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

2. Veggies & Hummus

Slip a couple extra servings of vegetables into your morning by arming your desk with fresh carrots, celery, cucumber, and snap peas. Pair with homemade hummus for added protein.

3. Popcorn

Air popped popcorn supplies fiber, antioxidants, and a satisfying crunch. Get creative with healthy toppings, such as parmesan & rosemary, black pepper & sea salt, coconut & curry, or low sodium soy sauce.

4. Pumpkin Seeds

One handful of these energizing seeds supplies almost 50% of the recommended intake of magnesium [1]. Select a pumpkin from your local grocery store and roast and flavor the seeds yourself.

5. Protein Bar

Fill your mid-day pangs with a PGX® Satisfast™ Organic Vegan 15 g Protein Bar. Made with plant proteins that are easy to digest and 100% vegan, these bars are a satisfying mid-day snack!

6. Grapes

Put a healthy twist on sugar cravings with a cup of fresh, chilled grapes. You may be surprised how invigorating their sweet-tart flavor can be. As a low glycemic index (GI) food, grapes help maintain healthy blood sugar levels already within the normal range*.

7. Edamame

Steamed soybeans make a simple and savory snack. They contain fiber and protein, as well as good monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats to help keep you full.

* This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to  diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

References:

[1] USDA. “National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 27.”  Agricultural Research Service. Web. 11 October 2015.

 


About the Author

Patience Lister is a Vancouver, B.C. based freelance writer specializing in food and natural health products. She has been writing and conducting research for these sectors since 2005 with a particular focus on nutrition and quality.